3 Reasons Why You Need A Run Coach

Whether you’re a brand new runner or a devoted km warrior there are plenty of ways working with a running coach will improve your running and up your 2019 race game to the next level. As a Tribe this has been something we’ve considered doing for a while and I am so excited for us to team up with Michael Liberzon of X3 Training to help you become a stronger runner and chase down those goals.

Not sure whether a running coach is for you? Here are a few reason why it is – and more details on our Tribe Performance Race Team below.

1. Determine Your Proper Volume.One of the toughest things for any runner (new or old) is determining the proper amount of volume. Too much can have you injured and sidelined before you even hit the start line and too little can have you under prepared and regretting your life choices come race day. Many variables go into this equation (e.g., your goal, experience running, history of injury/health) and your coach will help you decipher them all and on an ongoing basis too.

2. Push Your Pace (or Don’t). Are your tempo runs to slow? Are your long runs to fast? Do you even know what I’m talking about? Well your run coach will take the guess work out of your workout paces and get you ready for race day based on your current level of fitness and goals for your race. Your pace is always evolving and your coach is here for you, helping you take your workouts to the next level – in a safe and controlled way.

3. It’s More Than Just Running.Running to race is more than just tying on your shoes and heading out the door. We approach running from a holistic perspective, so not only will your coach help your running performance, but they are here to answer invaluable advice on strength training, your mental game, workout nutrition, and pre- and post- race day procedures, as well as anything else you might need to toe the start line when it comes to running and race day procedures.

Introducing the Tribe Performance Race Team

The Tribe Performance Race Team is an in person coached group training program suitable for both beginners and experienced runners looking to chase down goals from 5km to marathon distances. The program is group coaching designed to help you get faster and
learn proper training techniques from our certified coaches. All paces and experience levels are invited. Basic Membership Plan option includes:

  • Two weekly Tribe Performance Race Team coached team workouts at 7pm every Tuesday starting at Tribe and Thursday at Monarch Park at 7pm (additional track fees apply).
  • General team training plan for either beginner, 5km/10km, Half Marathon, Marathon.
  • 3 classes of runner’s choice monthly at Tribe to support training. Classes cannot be accumulated and will expire at end of month if not used.
  • Membership is minimum of 3 months commitment.
  • Members receive 10% of Tribe gear and accessories.
  • Access to a private Facebook messaging group.
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A new goal for #STWM – to rock the Scotiabank Charity Challenge

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Once again this year I’ll be racing the Canada Running Series Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Half Marathon, but this year I’m upping my goals – not by trying to rock a PB, although yes, I will give it a try, but by participating in the Scotiabank Charity Challenge fundraising for the YWCA Toronto.

The Scotiabank Charity Challenge unites the spirit of runners with a unique fundraising program to help create a stronger future for young people and build vibrant communities.

In 2017, participants raised $3.5 million for 199 community charities through the Scotiabank Charity Challenge at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. This has a huge impact.

As many of you know my mum, Jill Rumble, was the CEO of the YWCA Hamilton, before passing away 14 years ago of ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). The YWCA played a huge role in my life growing up – not only keeping my sister and I busy as kids through swimming, dance, and gymnastics, but gave us our first jobs as camp councillors and life guards, but most importantly created my foundational love of fitness which had direct impact on my profession now and opening Tribe. I remember in high school waking up early on Saturday morning and going with my mum to aerobics class. Like 90s style aerobics high four-count beats, grapevines, box steps, and lots of clapping. I loved it.

Through the Scotiabank Charity Challenge, the YWCA of Toronto is hoping to reach their goal of raising $25,000 for programs that will help women and girls triumph over the barriers to equality and to make a better, more equitable world for us all.

Here’s how you can help me:

  1. Donate! Any amount of money to support this cause close to my heart is greatly appreciated. Skip your morning coffee for a couple days and help us out. Click here to donate. Now I realize it might not be that simple for some of you so, here are some other options.
  2. Share this post! You’ve got friends and followers, please let them know why this cause is important and share away.
  3. Run and fundraise yourself. More hands (or sneakers in this case) make for light work. Check out the list of official charities here. Create an account and fundraise for a charity that’s important to you.

Thanks for supporting in any way to you. See you at the start line!

Heather

How Toronto can become a more ‘welcoming place’ for runners – and their tourism dollars

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Photo by Patrick Leung – the Ghost Race

Back in May 2017 I was invited to speak at City Hall sharing my perspective on Running Tourism in the City of Toronto. I had previously written for iRun magazine on Running Tourism, researching both the monetary benefits and social benefits for communities including Toronto, NYC, Ottawa, and Vancouver. So my perspective has came from that of a marathon runner in other countries, the research I complied for iRun, and my experiences as a leader in the Toronto run community. I was happy to share what I thought the city could do to support this sport and it’s athletes from near and afar and I was happy to continue the conversation in early 2018 as part of the working group establishing recommendations for the city council’s economic development committee. Some thoughts on that initial conversation were shared here by CBC.

On April 14th, the report that had been developed through the established working group of City Councillors, City employees, and community stake holders was released and the city council’s economic development committee voted to take a closer look at our recommendations.

Some recommendations from the working group included ideas like opening public transit earlier, having various City teams communicate more clearly and easily with race directors, and some welcoming and inviting tasks like displaying race promotional material on bus shelters, street banners, and even at the air port, as many Marathon Majors do welcoming athletes to the city and celebrating the event.

We highlight the financial benefit to the city, including a comparison of Toronto’s two marathons (and yes, only have one major race was brought up) to Marathon Majors including NYC ($36 Million CAD of $415 Million USD).

CBC did a follow up interview which I supported. You can check it out here.

As the city council’s economic development committee will be taking a closer look at these recommendations I am glad the the conversation continues and look forward to Toronto continuing to grow as an epic place to race and live.