Restart Your Workout

January 1st has come and gone, but every day, week, month is a fresh start to examine or re-examine those goals and get moving.  Here are four full-body moves that are equipment free, and can happen in minimal-space wherever you are.

Consider grouping the found moves together for a 4-minute circuit and sneak it in as many times as possible during the day.

Check out as I shared on CH Morning Live on Tuesday January 16th. Watch the segment here.

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1. Four Step Squat: Start in a narrow squat with feet under your hips. Sit back into a squat position with knees above the ankles, and your body weight on your heels. Return to standing and step your feet just wider then hip distance apart and repeat the squat. Return to stand and repeat to more times, each time steeping your feet out wider until you are in a wide plie squat. Return to standing and repeat all four on the other side.

2. Plank Walk Out: Start standing with the feet shoulder width apart and arms hanging down to the sides of the body. Slightly bend the knees and bend over and placing the hands shoulder width apart on the floor, so your body is in the shape of an inverted V. Walk forward four steps forward with your hands until you reach a plank position. Walk hands back in towards your feet and return to stand.

3. Alternating Shoulder Tap and Hinge: On the knees or toes, maintain a balance and stable hip position while touching the opposite hand to shoulder. Next hinge at the waist reaching your right hand towards your left ankle, return to plank, then hinge reaching your left hand towards your right ankle. Alternate touching shoulder, shoulder, ankle, ankle. To decrease the challenge, increase the distance between the knees widening your base of support.

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4. Marching Hip Raise: Lie face-up on the floor with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Raise your hips so your body forms a straight line from your shoulders to your knees. Lift one knee to your chest, lower back to the start, and lift your other knee to your chest. Continue to alternate back and forth and to make it harder, lift those hands up and decrease your base of support.

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5 Tips to Up Your Running Game in 2018!

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This post was originally written for and shared by Canada Running Series. View the original post here.

The start of a new year is a great time to set goals and try something new. So whether you are starting to run for fun, or are fired up as a goal crusher. Here are 5 tips to help you up your running game in 2018!

5 Tips to Run for Fun!

1. Track progress. Whether it’s on your favourite app (there are so many out there) or on an old fashioned calendar on your fridge, tracking your workouts, recording how you feel, or even checking something off your monthly workout plan will give you that extra feeling of progress and accomplishment.

2. Create the perfect playlist or find the perfect podcast. Music or podcasts can be a great motivator to help you get to into the running mood! Make a new playlist filled with high-tempo tracks or save a new podcast for each workout to inspire you to keep moving while on route.

3. Sign up for a race/fun run. Committing to an event gives you a good reason to create a training plan and stick to it. Start planning ahead now, the Race Roster Spring Run Off is just around the corner.

4. Fuel up. Running on an empty stomach can keep you from having the right amount of energy, but eating too much can lead to cramping. Look for a small snack containing carbs and protein for sustained energy.

5. Join a run Tribe. Whether it’s a friend or family member, community run crew, or virtual group of online friends, having people with a similar interest to connect with and learn from will help keep you accountable and having fun.

5 Tips for the Goal Crushers!

1. Get into proper form. It may seem like the simplest way to work out, but running does take knowledge and skill to make sure you don’t end up on the injured list. Get reading, listening, or meeting with professionals in your community to make sure you’re running to the best of your ability.

2. Get out of town! Taking your runs to new roads is a great way to combine travel and your favourite sport. Destination races within Canada or abroad will leave you with a new sense of adventure and motivation to move.

3. Cross train. Don’t limit yourself to improving your pace only out on the road. There are many things you can do when you aren’t running that can help: Take a yoga class to improve your flexibility; strength train regularly to build speed and prevent injuries; meditate to find focus and calm those pre-race jitters.

4. Roll out. Massage your muscles with a roller to increase flexibility and range of movement in the knees while breaking down scar tissue and adhesions.

5. Give back. Whether you volunteer to help a new group of runners get their start, support your local school’s track and friend day, or give your time stuffing kits at a race expo, giving your time back to the sport you love will leave you filled with gratitude and pride for your local run community.

The RBC Olympian Program Gives Canada’s Top Athletes The Competitive Edge In Sport And Life

coc-rbc-lockup_headerFor many young people, starting out in the workforce can be challenging – lack of experience, skills, and opportunities. For Canada’s elite-level athletes who have spent most of their life focused on sport, it can be an even more daunting task. Understanding these pressures, RBC welcomed 57 athletes to its 2017/2018 workforce as part of the RBC Olympian Program. I was invited to attend the celebration event on September 27th and found out first hand from the athletes the importance of this program, as well as ask them some of your questions shared with me through social.

Established in 2002, the RBC Olympian Program enables athletes, from both summer and winter sports, as well as those transitioning out of sport, to work on RBC initiatives and engage as community ambassadors to speak about their experiences and the Olympic values of commitment, excellence, teamwork and leadership to audiences across the country.

“We recognize that the road to the Olympics isn’t an easy one, and that’s why RBC continues to make a significant commitment to Canadian athletes through the RBC Olympians program. We want to make sure that athletes can stay focused on their Olympic dreams while also honing the skills they need to be successful in life after sport.”
– Matt McGlynn, Vice President, Brand Marketing RBC

This was a point shared by each of the athletes I interviewed, giving gratitude and appreciation to RBC for the financial support and opportunity for flexible employment that fits with their intense training schedules.

Athlete Interviews

As part of the launch of this years RBC Olympian Program I had the pleasure to live tweet the event (search the hashtag #RBCOlympian on twitter) and share via my Instagram interviews with some of Canada’s top athletes. Prior to the event I asked YOU for some of your “hard hitting” questions 😉

So here they are, along with a short athlete bio.

Spencer O’Brien – (Women’s Slopestyle Snowboard) – Spencer O’Brien is a First Nations athlete from British Columbia, who won a silver medal during 2016/17 World Cup season. O’Brien was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis a week before Sochi 2014, but still competed. O’Brien is managing the disease and is considered a medal contender again.

Here’s what Spencer had to say about snacks, rest days, her favourite podcast, and pre-competition rituals:

Mercedes Nicoll – (Women’s Snowboard halfpipe) – Mercedes Nicoll is a veteran of the national team, who competed in Sochi 2014 which was her third Olympic Games (she finished 25th). She has been named to the national snowboard team for 2017/18 so hopes to make PyeongChang her 4th Olympic Games.

Here’s what Mercedes had to say about self-care, eating healthy, her favourite fitness move (which we try), how she unwinds at the end of the day, how she defines success, and her training mantra:

Tyler McGregor – (Sledge hockey) – Tyler McGregor was the sledge hockey team captain of the bronze medal team at the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Games. He was the youngest member of Canada’s gold medal winning team at the 2013 IPC World Championships, and is said to be “on the fast track to success in the sport”.

In 2009, as an able-bodied ice hockey player at the AAA level, the 16-year-old McGregor broke his ankle and both bones in his leg. As his leg healed and he returned to playing ice hockey, a large lump developed on the site of the original fracture. At first doctors ruled out anything serious, and he continued to play, but the lump grew larger, and the pain intensified, he eventual received the diagnosis of Spindle Cell Sarcoma, a form of soft tissue cancer, in January 2010. McGregor then underwent eight months of chemotherapy and the amputation of his left leg. McGregor realized quickly that he wanted to get back into hockey and started playing again with a standing amputee team. However he switched to sledge hockey in 2011 and his determination has led him to the national team.

Here’s what Tyler had to say about sport-life balance, favourite snack on the go, cross training, rest days, his athletic hero, his favourite book, and how he celebrates success:

Sarah Wells – (Track and Field) – Sarah Wells made her Olympic debut at London 2012 where she advanced to the semifinals of the 400m hurdles. She had remarkably qualified for the Games after being sidelined for nine months in 2011 when she was diagnosed with a stress fracture in her left femur. Wells went on to compete at the 2013 Summer Universiade where she won silver with the 4x400m relay and just missed the podium with her fourth place finish in the 400m hurdles. Wells was then out for another six months with a re-occurrence of the stress fracture in her femur. She came back to capture her fourth Canadian title in 2015, following her 400m hurdles victories in 2012, 2010, and 2008. Wells also won a pair of medals at the Pan Am Games in Toronto.

Here’s what Sarah had to say about sport-life balance, when she feels her most powerful, her least favourite workout, what she does to unwind, what advice she would give her younger self, and her pre-race rituals:

Since 1947, RBC has been the longest-standing supporter of Canada’s Olympic Team and has hired approximately 400 current and retired Olympic and Paralympic athletes through the RBC Olympian Program, with more than 20 becoming full time employees. It was an honour to meet with these high level athletes, ask them questions, and hear how RBC has made a positive impact on their training. I can’t wait to follow along as Spencer, Mercedes, and Tyler head to PyeongChang in 2018.