A new goal for #STWM – to rock the Scotiabank Charity Challenge

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Once again this year I’ll be racing the Canada Running Series Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Half Marathon, but this year I’m upping my goals – not by trying to rock a PB, although yes, I will give it a try, but by participating in the Scotiabank Charity Challenge fundraising for the YWCA Toronto.

The Scotiabank Charity Challenge unites the spirit of runners with a unique fundraising program to help create a stronger future for young people and build vibrant communities.

In 2017, participants raised $3.5 million for 199 community charities through the Scotiabank Charity Challenge at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. This has a huge impact.

As many of you know my mum, Jill Rumble, was the CEO of the YWCA Hamilton, before passing away 14 years ago of ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). The YWCA played a huge role in my life growing up – not only keeping my sister and I busy as kids through swimming, dance, and gymnastics, but gave us our first jobs as camp councillors and life guards, but most importantly created my foundational love of fitness which had direct impact on my profession now and opening Tribe. I remember in high school waking up early on Saturday morning and going with my mum to aerobics class. Like 90s style aerobics high four-count beats, grapevines, box steps, and lots of clapping. I loved it.

Through the Scotiabank Charity Challenge, the YWCA of Toronto is hoping to reach their goal of raising $25,000 for programs that will help women and girls triumph over the barriers to equality and to make a better, more equitable world for us all.

Here’s how you can help me:

  1. Donate! Any amount of money to support this cause close to my heart is greatly appreciated. Skip your morning coffee for a couple days and help us out. Click here to donate. Now I realize it might not be that simple for some of you so, here are some other options.
  2. Share this post! You’ve got friends and followers, please let them know why this cause is important and share away.
  3. Run and fundraise yourself. More hands (or sneakers in this case) make for light work. Check out the list of official charities here. Create an account and fundraise for a charity that’s important to you.

Thanks for supporting in any way to you. See you at the start line!

Heather

Gear Review: New Balance Printed High Rise Transform Crop 2.0

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For my Foam Rolling video shoot with Best Health Magazine I was sent a pair of New Balance’s new Printed High Rise Transform Crop 2.0 in Galaxy and I love them!

The navy crops have rose gold and navy taping zig zagging across the calf and thigh which gives these pants a very modern look with the perfect pop of colour. They are styled here with the Captivate Tank in Himalayan Pink and the FuelCore NERGIZE shoes in Magnet – they also have a pop of rose gold on the heel.

The high waist band helps to keep that core feeling supported and the high waist band even has a small pocket.

From yoga to high intensity training, the contoured waist band of these crops helps them move with you and keep you cool with power mesh for breath-ability. The fabric of these crops is stretchy NB Dry fabric that wicks sweat away while and contains NB Fresh anti-microbial coating to resist odors so you can go from your workout to brunch confidently without a change of clothes.

You can grab them online from New Balance Canada for $94.99.

Teachers say they’ll find a way to keep Ontario’s updated sex-ed curriculum alive.

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As many of you are aware my I’ve spent nearly 15 years in public education, teaching and consulting on health and physical education. In 2008 I was part of the technical analysis of the 1998 curriculum identifying areas that needed to be revised, and then in the summer of 2009 I was a member of a diverse writing team for the health and physical education curriculum from grades 1-12. This was an amazing experience which connected me with awesome leaders across the province and led to my consulting position at Ophea and experiences trainer teachers from across the province for the past 8 years.

Last week, in less than a month in office, Doug Ford announced that Ontario public schools will revert back no the 1998 curriculum, disregarding all research, parent and student consultation, and international best practices on sexual health education. This 42-page document refers to “Sexually Transmitted Infections” and “STDs”, the Internet as the “World Wide Web,” and has no mention of consent, social media, and the devise families we see today. It also contains minimal reference to mental health, and the application of relationship and social skills in a sexual health context.

Last week I was interviewed by Macleans Magazine on what I thought Teacher’s would do regarding this change. I know great teachers will make the best decisions for their students. That’s our job. As the article statesTeachers, she explains, will be able to have discussions in the classroom about current events happening in their communities, or issues arising from their use of social media, which will serve as opportunities to introduce ideas from the 2015 curriculum. ‘It’s about having valuable conversations with students that they might need in a way that’s relevant to them,’ she says.”

Read the full article here: https://www.macleans.ca/education/teachers-will-find-a-way-to-keep-ontarios-updated-sex-ed-curriculum-alive/

Ophea has also put out a statement saying that they will not be revising their health lessons  reverting them back to the 1998 content and state “Ophea and OASPHE continue to believe that students have a right to learn from an up-to-date, research-based Health and Physical Education curriculum that includes human development and sexual health education.” View Ophea’s advocacy tools here.